Home News 2019 Mazda CX-9 Preview

2019 Mazda CX-9 Preview

2019 Mazda CX-9

The second generation of the CX-9 has proven to be very popular with everyone that comes in contact with it. Most media outlets and consumers are impressed with the vehicle’s design, both inside and out, the powertrain and overall performance.

It was introduced for the 2017 model-year considerably upgraded for 2018 (G-Vectoring Control, numerous safety features like Blind Spot Monitoring and rear cross traffic alert, and much more). And guess what? Mazda’s doing it again for the 2019 model year.

Consumers are taking notice in a big way. So far this year, the midsize-large 3-row SUV segment is losing ground in Canada with only two exceptions, one being the Mazda CX-9 which, year to date, has gained 17.3% in sales over the same period last year.

Loads more in-vehicle technology

According to the NHTSA, distractions are the main cause of accidents. There is a correlation between visual/cognitive/manual demands in a car and in order limit this, Mazda uses a heads-up cockpit philosophy. Its purpose is meant to insure that the information channelled to the driver is focused on the task at hand which is driving.

Physically, nothing changes in the cabin. The HMI controls are within natural reach and consist of only five buttons and two knobs (part of Mazda Connect). The only visual upgrade is the

new 7-inch digital cluster display that only presents driving-related information in the GT and Signature trims.

What you don’t immediately see is that Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are finally available! Best of all, they are standard across the carline. When the device (aka smartphone) is connected, the CX-9’s voice recognition button activates Siri or Google Assistant. As well, the Entertainment, Home, and NAV buttons activate the related CarPlay or Android Auto function. In other words, the Entertainment and NAV buttons are contextually aware of what you’re using at the moment. If you want to switch to CarPlay or Android, perform a short press on the Home button. A long press will send you to Mazda Connect’s user interface. It’ll do the same if you use Waze as a navigation system, which is brilliant!

SiriusXM Traffic Plus and Travel Link services with a 5-year trial subscription are also included with the GT and Signature trims. With it, you get live traffic updates, weather, fuel prices, parking info and much more.

And now for the other half of the improvements

Mazda’s going all out to take the 2019 CX-9 to the next level. The idea here is to maintain the CX-9’s lead in overall refinement be it for the passengers or the driver. To name a few, Mazda’s upgraded the roof liner, improvements to rear assist grips and to the 2nd row seat armrest.

The more important bits include mild suspension and steering revisions for a better driving experience. For the safety-minded, all contents of the GS i-ACTIVSENSE Package (intelligent cruise control with Stop & Go function, pedestrian detection, lane departure warning and assist, and more) is now standard when the vehicle is equipped with iACTIV AWD.

Further changes include 20-inch alloys on the GS-L, ventilated front seats and 360° view monitor on the GT. Pricing for the 2019 Mazda CX-9 has thus risen but all the extra improvements and technology easily justify the increases.

Here’s the new pricing structure:

GS FWD: $36,700
GS AWD: $40,000
GS-L: $43,300
GT: $48,500
Signature: $51,500

The 2019 CX-9 is in showrooms now.

2019 Mazda CX-9 (2)

3 COMMENTS

  1. I have a 2014 Sorento which I will replace in November. I’m down to the new Sorento, the Santa Fe or the CX-9. Any thoughts?

    • The new Santa Fe is fine. Although it’s all new on the outside, there are no real improvements to speak of other than the 8-speed automatic transmission. The 3-row Santa Fe (Palisade) will only be available at a later date in 2019. The 2019 Sorento is fair as well. Its advantage is the 3.3L V6 which is smooth, reliable and no worse fuel-consumption wise than the 2.0L turbo in the Santa Fe. The CX-9 is no more reliable than the others (2.5T has experienced teething issues) but it feels far more upscale inside and out and is more interesting to drive. We’d opt for the Mazda if it were up to us.

      • The 3.3 liter reliable? I’ve had problems since day one with it. Kia is dead to me now, I got a an Explorer Sport with the 3.5 liter ecoobost and love it. Kills anything coming out of Japan or Korea.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here