Wednesday, May 22, 2024
First Reviews2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo First Drive Review: A 2.2-ton Sprinter

2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo First Drive Review: A 2.2-ton Sprinter

The all-new 2025 Porsche Taycan GT is an absolute rocket on wheels.


Strengths

  • Insane performance

  • Surprising ride comfort

  • Very docile to drive


Weaknesses

  • Very high price

  • Limited use

  • Not very practical for everyday use


Monteblanco, Spain. Imagine for a moment that Shaquille O’neal runs the 100-metre dash faster than Usain Bolt, is more agile than Walter Peyton and can read the game better than Wayne Gretzky. You probably think I’m messing with you. No, I’ve just described the new Porsche Taycan Turbo GT. A 2.2-ton beast that, against all reason, can make any exotic blush in a straight line and keep up with the most agile sports car on the racetrack.

2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette

Cutting calories

Since the batteries are heavy, you must find chop extra kilos elsewhere. Porsche has succeeded in subtracting many of them. Carbon fibre covers the B-pillars, mirrors and side skirts. Porsche has removed the carpet, abandoned the soft-closing doors and electric charging flap, and even ripped out the analog clock that comes as standard with the Sport Chrono package. The Weissach edition adds a carbon-fibre spoiler. Carbon ceramic brakes and 21-inch forged wheels are lighter than those on the Turbo S, and the wheels are wrapped in Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R tires unique to this version. The Weissach edition also eliminates the rear seats to save a few extra kilos. In all, this version is 75 kilos lighter than the turbo S. Due to crash regulations, carbon buckets are not available in North America.

The Taycan Turbo GT here is equipped with Porsche’s adaptive Plus sports seats with 18-way power adjustment and memory option. The Turbo GT logo is stamped on the headrests, naturally. The technological offering has also been simplified. There’s a 16.8-inch curved screen for the gauges, and two touchscreens in the center control the infotainment system. The top screen is integrated into the dashboard and measures 10.9 inches. There are no entertainment screens for rear passengers behind the front seats, and no passenger screen either.

2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette

Over a thousand horsepower

Considering the 10 seconds of supercharging, power rises from 777 standard horsepower and 988 lb-ft of torque to 1,019 horsepower with the new Attack Mode function and 1,092 lb-ft of torque. You can activate it simply by pulling the right-hand paddle. This enables the car to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in 2.2 seconds and 0-200 km/h in 6.4 seconds. Thanks to these features, the Weissach edition Turbo GT completed a lap at Laguna Seca in 1:27.87 – faster than any other electric car before it. And in early January, a development prototype covered the Nürburgring in 7:07.55 – faster than any other EV or saloon, petrol or electric. The secret of this new-found speed is a pulse inverter that uses silicon carbide to send up to 900 amps to the new rear axle motor (for all Taycans), instead of just 600 amps in the Turbo S model. It delivers more power and efficiency in a lighter package. It’s around 20 pounds lighter than the outgoing rear engine, and the whole Turbo GT is up to 157 pounds lighter than the Turbo S (with the Weissach package).


Stunning experience

2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette

Our driving experience took place at the Monteblanco circuit in Spain. We were skeptical about the suitability of a 2.2-ton car as a “race car”. By the end of the day, we were converted. The power is staggering, but even more remarkable is how easy this beast is to drive. Our first contact was in the rain on a soggy circuit, where we powered through the pit straight at 250 km/h before slamming on the brakes in the first corner, all the while maintaining control. This driving supremacy is indebted to an exceptional mastery of all the driving systems. In addition to air suspension, Porsche adds Active Ride as standard for the Turbo GT, which, together with air springs and an active damping system, controls all body movements while dispensing with anti-roll bars. Instead of being simple passive telescopic tubes that resist extension or compression, the active dampers have hydraulic oil pumped into them under high pressure to control the compression – or rebound – of the suspension as the wheels follow the contours of the road. Whatever the road conditions, the vehicle remains flat. The control system measures the vertical acceleration of the wheels and body movements, then calculates how much force to apply to each shock absorber and when. The system’s reaction time is instantaneous, reacting 13 times per second (13 hertz) and capable of keeping the car level during sudden braking or acceleration. It’s almost like magic, such is the power of this system.


Gets expensive fast

2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette

Whether you opt for the turbo GT or the Weissach edition, the price starts at $270,000. A price tag commensurate with the model’s technology and power. You’ll have fewer options than other versions, but you should expect to pay around $350,000 for a well-kitted model. The Taycan 2025 can be recharged on 800-volt DC charging stations at a maximum power of 320 kW under ideal conditions. That’s 50 kW more than before. The fast-charge window of the new performance battery has been considerably enlarged. In addition, a 150 kW DC/DC converter is now included as standard, to optimize charging speeds on 400-volt networks. Depending on individual driving style, among other variables, this can reduce the time needed to go from 10% to 80% charge compared with the previous car. In the first-generation Taycan, the charging time from 10% to 80% SOC at 15 degrees Celsius is 37 minutes. Under ideal conditions, the new Taycan takes just 18 minutes, despite a larger battery capacity. The advertised range for Europe is 555 km. Official figures for Canada have not yet been released.


Conclusion

Do you need a Porsche Taycan Turbo GT? Of course not. Is it one of the craziest cars we’ve ever driven? Absolutely. But to tell you the truth, a 4S version will more than make up for it, with a smaller hole in your budget, but only slightly smaller.

2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette
2025 Porsche Taycan GT Turbo | Photo: Benoit Charette

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