Thursday, June 30, 2022
5 Questions Answered 5 Questions About the 2021 Koenigsegg Gemera Answered

5 Questions About the 2021 Koenigsegg Gemera Answered

We answer 5 questions on the new Koenigsegg Gemera, the first 4-seater Koenigsegg.

We were expecting to come face-to-face with the Koenigsegg Gemera in early March at the 2020 Geneva Motor Show but the rapidly spreading Coronavirus put a stop to that. Thankfully, owner and founder, Christian Von Koenigsegg, went ahead without the show to introduce this incredible 4-seater hyper-GT car.

The new Koenigsegg Gemera could have simply been an extended Agera with seating for four however this is not how the Swedish supercar manufacturer operates. The Gemera is a radical machine loaded with technology, power and speed.

Let’s now answer 5 questions on the new 4-seater Koenigsegg.


What’s New About The 2021 Koenigsegg Gemera?

2021 Koenigsegg Gemera Drivetrain | Photo: Koenigsegg

In Koenigsegg terms, the Gemera is a revolution. In fact, and we have to agree, Koenigsegg says the Gemera has a created a new car category: the Mega-GT. It’s a grand tourer with respect to the fact that it can seat for “large adults” comfortably with sufficient space for their luggage. It’s mega in every other respect.

The Gemera is a plug-in hybrid that features three electric motors. There’s one per rear wheel and each produce a whopping 500-horsepower and 738 lb.-ft of torque. There also a 400-horsepower (with 369 lb.-ft. of torque) electric motor on the internal combustion engine’s crankshaft which helps feed the front wheels. The ICE is quite a piece…

Known as the Tiny Friendly Giant, this mid-rear mounted engine is a camless 3-cylider 2,0-litre twin-turbocharged engine that, on its own, generates a massive 600-horsepower and 443 lb.-ft of torque from 2,000 to 7,000 rpm. As the word camless suggest, the 3-cylinder does not have camshafts. Instead, it relies on individual computer-controlled actuators which independently open, close (and everything in between) all the intake and exhaust valves. What’s more, this TFG can run on gen 2.0 ethanol or CO2 neutral methanol like Vulcanol or any mix of these substances. It’s also E85 ready and if you must, regular petrol will do.

All told, system output is a staggering 1,700-horsepower and 2,581 lb.-ft of torque. With this power, the Gemera launches to 100km/h in 1.9 seconds, will hit 400km/h or more given enough room.

The greener side of the Gemera is that the electric motors, fed by an 800-volt 15-kWh battery pack, can cover up to 50km (WLTP) on a full charge. It can also push the car up to 340km/h without any fuel. With a full tank, and battery, the Gemera has a maximum total range of 1,000km.

2021 Koenigsegg Gemera

The Gemera also features a novel transmission, or way to transmit power to the wheels. The Koenigsegg Direct Drive (KDD) is a single gear direct drive unit that multiplies torque thanks to the torque-converting HydraCoup. The latter is an advanced type of torque converter with a lock-up functionality. It is the key player in the single-speed front driveline that allows smooth and progressive power transfer from the combustion engine.

Physically, the Gemera is every bit a Koenigsegg with its two dihedral synchro-helix doors. One of the coolest aspects of the car is the complete absence of “B” pillars which enables easy access to the rear seats, which happen to be identical to the fronts.


What’s The 2021 Koenigsegg Gemera’s Price?

Keeping in mind Koenigsegg’s portfolio of past and current products, the Gemera is not that expensive…

Among the $2 million Regera, $2.5 million Agera RS and $2.8 million Jesko, the Gemera’s starting price of only $1.7 million seems like a good deal.


When Will It Be Released And How Many Will Be Built?

Production of the new Koenigsegg Gemera is set to begin in the second half of 2020 and be ready for delivery sometime in 2021. Compared to the Jesko, which was limited to 125 examples, Koenigsegg will assemble 300 Gemeras.


Who Will It Compete With?

The Koenigsegg Gemera, as cliché as it sounds, does not have any direct PHEV 4-seater 2-door competition. If we stretch a little, there are “alternative” to the Gemera, kind of.

You could consider the Bentley Continental GT, the Aston Martin DB11 and DBS Superleggera, the Ferrari GTC4Lusso, the McLaren GT, and the BMW M8. Elsewhere, it might compete with the Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid, the Mercedes-AMG GT 63 S 4-door, the Audi RS 7 Sportback, the Aston Martin Rapide AMR and that’s about it.


What Do We Think About the 2021 Koenigsegg Gemera?

 

Koenigsegg Gemera | Photo: Koenigsegg

The Koenisegg Gemera is stunning, highly desirable and currently has no true equal. We love how Koenisegg continues to make what was once impossible, too expensive or complicated seem like child’s play.

We are huge fans of the brand and we take one over a Pagani, Ferrari and almost another hyper-exotic car.

Koenigsegg Gemera | Photo: Koenigsegg

Koenigsegg Gemera | Photo: Koenigsegg

Koenigsegg Gemera | Photo: Koenigsegg

Koenigsegg Gemera | Photo: Koenigsegg

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Matt St-Pierre
Trained as an Automotive Technician, Matt has two decades of automotive journalism under his belt. He’s done TV, radio, print and this thing called the internet. He’s an avid collector of many 4-wheeled things, all of them under 1,500 kg, holds a recently expired racing license and is a father of two. Life is beautiful. Send Matt an emai

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