Friday, October 22, 2021
News Once A Transition Vehicle, Plug-In Hybrids Have Already Reached Their Best-Before Date

Once A Transition Vehicle, Plug-In Hybrids Have Already Reached Their Best-Before Date

The PHEV’s advantage comes from its battery. The “disadvantage” comes from the fact that it does not need to be plugged in


  • Europe is looking to ban PHEVs as green vehicles.

  • Most automakers plan to sell PHEVs until the end of the decade.

  • One of the main issues with PHEVs is that many owners rarely plug them in.


Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles were meant to bridge the old internal combustion engine car with the fully electric ones. The idea of some purely electric range established hybrid powertrain efficiency, and an ICE meant, on paper, that owners could enjoy pure-electric driving over short distances without ever feeling anxiety over range. One of the issues with PHEVs is the former: owners are not plugging them in.

Tougher European rules are in the works to ban manufacturers from labeling PHEVs as “sustainable investments” beyond 2025. In other words, there’s a movement from leading environmental groups that want to see PHEVs’ green credentials removed and subsidies cut. Incentives seem to be the main motivation behind consumers buying them.

Land Rover Defender 110 PHEV | Photo: Land Rover

A study conducted by the International Council on Clean Transportation reports that PHEVs’ fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are up to four times the level they are approved for because people do not charge them often enough. The fact is that most PHEVs are considerably heavier than their ICE equivalents which means they consume more fuel to circulate when the batteries are depleted.

Julia Poliscanova, senior director for vehicles and e-mobility at European NGO Transport & Environment, said: “From the perspective of environment and climate, today’s plug-in hybrid technology is worse than what it is replacing.”

Meanwhile, automakers are not enthralled by these proposed EU policy plans as, if they go through, they will essentially kill the PHEV market.

Reuters reports: “It’s crazy to do this by 2025 because effectively you kill demand today,” said Adrian Hallmark, CEO of British luxury carmaker Bentley, a unit of Volkswagen, referring to proposals to not classify PHEVs as sustainable investments. He plans to sell PHEVs until 2030 before going all-electric. He added: “For most people, a battery-electric car is not yet practical.”

Carmakers need now decide what to do with their resources.

Trending Now

Stellantis and Samsung to Build Batteries in the US Together

The factory will have a maximum production capacity of 40 GWh The location for the facility has yet to be determined Stellantis also...

Stellantis and LG will Make Battery Cells in North America

Stellantis wants to have 40% of its US sales to be electrified by 2030 Many new electric and hybrid products should be introduced...

2022 Kia Sportage to be unveiled on October 27

Kia continues to renew its lineup with the scheduled October 27th presentation of the new 2022 Sportage, which will finally make its North American...

GMC Hummer EV is Entering Pre-Production

Pre-Production has begun and regular production is expected by the end of the year The Hummer EV will be made in GM’s Factory...

The Average Chevrolet Buyer Spent Over $50k for their New Car

The average price is up 23.3% from September 2020. Incentive spending is down which impacts the final price. Once upon a time, Chevrolet was...
Matt St-Pierre
Trained as an Automotive Technician, Matt has two decades of automotive journalism under his belt. He’s done TV, radio, print and this thing called the internet. He’s an avid collector of many 4-wheeled things, all of them under 1,500 kg, holds a recently expired racing license and is a father of two. Life is beautiful. Send Matt an emai

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.