Sunday, May 22, 2022
News The Semi-Conductor Shortage is Not Over Yet: Volkswagen and Audi to Remove...

The Semi-Conductor Shortage is Not Over Yet: Volkswagen and Audi to Remove Features

Volkswagen and Audi will remove some features from their most popular models due to the semi-conductor shortage.

  • Most lower trim Volkswagen models will lose the blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert

  • Audi will remove different features depending on the models

  • The deleted features will come with a credit

The semi-conductor shortage is not over yet and some manufacturers are still removing features from their cars. The latest brands to do so are Volkswagen and Audi.

The two German brands announced this week that they will remove some features from most of their vehicles, especially the lower trim ones.

Volkswagen will forgo the blind spot monitoring system with rear cross-traffic alert on more affordable versions of the Atlas, Atlas Cross Sport, Taos, Jetta and Tiguan. This will be accompanied with a $450 credit in the US, except for the Atlas and Atlas Cross Sport, for which it will be $500.

Some trims of the Atlas, Atlas Cross Sport and the Tiguan will revert to a manually operated liftgate for a credit of $300 or $400 and the Golf will lose its Harman Kardon premium sound system that was optional on the GTI and standard on the R for a $375 lower base price.

The Atlas and Atlas Cross Sport will also have to go without their factory installed trailer hitch, a feature valued at $550 by the automaker.

Reportedly, the Volkswagen models that are less popular will not be affected by this decision, so the Jetta GLI, the Passat, and the Arteon will keep offering their full list of features. The all-electric ID.4 will also be exempt from de-contenting despite the number of orders that are waiting to be fulfilled. This is because the production capacity for this model is already limited and the automaker doesn’t think removing features would improve the situation.

2021 Audi Q5 Sportback | Photo: Audi
2021 Audi Q5 Sportback | Photo: Audi

Volkswagen is not alone to go down that route, since Audi, its luxury brand, is doing the same at the moment.

Indeed, Audi announced that many features could be missing from new vehicles, depending on which model is chosen.

For example, some units of the Q3 could lose the smart key system in exchange for a $375 credit, while the S3 with Black Optics package could see its black roof be deleted. The reasoning behind this last decision is not entirely clear.

Moving up the ranks, the A4 and S4 will not be equipped with a towing module and the Q5 could have to make do without the blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert as well as the heated and cooled cup-holders. The first feature will grant a $350 credit while the second will remove $150 from the receipt.

Most other models, like the A6, S6, Q7, SQ7 and e-Tron will not be capable of displaying the tire pressure on the dashboard anymore and the Q7 and SQ7 will also see their towing module be removed.

Once the shortage eases, these features will be reintroduced to the equipment lists, but the cars built in the meantime are not likely to be able to be refitted with the missing options.

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