Tuesday, October 20, 2020
Glance 2021 Dodge Challenger At A Glance

2021 Dodge Challenger At A Glance

We take a look at the pros and cons of the 2021 Dodge Challenger

  • Super Stock package is the major change to the 2021 Dodge Challenger in Canada while the package is offered on the 2020 Challenger in the US

  • No other major changes expected to the Challenger in 2021

  • 13 colors offered on Challenger lineup


The Dodge Challenger gets a new Super Stock edition for 2021 (Super Stock offered on 2020 Challenger in the US) while the rest of the lineup remains basically unchanged.

2021 Dodge Challenger
2021 Dodge Challenger SRT Super Stock | Photo: Dodge

The 2021 Dodge lineup is all about power and the Challenger certainly fits right in. Base SXT and GT models get a 3.6-litre V6 that delivers 305 horsepower and 268 pound-feet of torque, enough to power the Challenger to 100 km/h (62 mph) in under 7.0 seconds. This engine can also be paired with all-wheel drive meaning that you can enjoy your Challenger in winter with no issues.

The R/T trim jumps immediately to a 5.7-litre V8 that delivers 375 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque. This engine can be paired with a manual gearbox or an automatic, and is RWD only.

2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Review: - W I D E B O O T Y -

Next comes a string of even more powerful V8 engines. The SRT Hellcat pumps out 717 horsepower and 656 pound-feet of torque while the SRT Hellcat Redeye delivers 797 horsepower and 707 pound-feet of torque. If that’s too much but the R/T isn’t enough, there’s also a 6.4-litre V8 with 485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque.

2021 Dodge Challenger
2021 Dodge Challenger | Photo: Dodge

And then there’s the 2021 Dodge Challenger Super Stock. Essentially built to go really fast at the drag strip like the Dodge Demon before it, the Super Stock sends 807 horsepower to the rear wheels which gets it to 60 mph (97 km/h) in 3.25 seconds. The quarter-mile breezes by in 10.5 seconds.

The Super Stock features standard drag radials which increase width by 3.5 inches, all-aluminium Brembo four-piston brakes, a limited slip rear differential with a 3.09 final drive, and more.

What The 2021 Dodge Challenger Does Well

1. There are a ton of available engines, more than any other muscle car. The four V8 engines deliver vastly different experiences behind the wheel, and the SRT Hellcat Redeye is simply out of this world. All sound great too. The V6 is obviously slower, but it still packs a ton of power and performance for the price.

2. The Dodge Challenger’s reliability in every trim is impressive. The thing can handle being thrown around a little.

3. The availability of all-wheel drive makes the Challenger unique in the muscle car segment. The Ford Mustang and the Chevrolet Camaro only offer RWD configurations.

4. The Challenger rides a perfect fine line between authentic muscle car performance and a comfortable daily driver. It burbles and grunts, but it’s actually quite composed and stable on the road. You can spend a few hours on the highway and not feel any fatigue.

5. The UConnect system is the best of any infotainment system offered on a muscle car.

6. The Super Stock model is awfully close to being a Demon.

2021 Dodge Challenger
2021 Dodge Challenger SRT Super Stock | Photo: Dodge

What The Dodge Challenger Doesn’t Do So Well

1. It feels heavier than a Mustang or Camaro. It also feels bigger, wider, harder to park, more difficult to drive in tight spots, and just bulkier overall.

2. Speaking of driving in tight spots, the Challenger is a nightmare in a crowded parking lot or a small city street. It has a huge footprint and a huge turning radius. We know this may not matter to muscle car buyers, but if you’re planing on using your Challenger daily, you should know it doesn’t like being near other cars.

3. SRT Hellcat and Hellcat Redeye models require some skill to properly enjoy. The back end can drift out on a wet road even at very low speeds and you never just “floor it”. You have to prepare ahead and roll on the power. Respect is key and some may not want to always worry about pedal pressure and steering angle.

4. Base V6 with AWD isn’t slow, but it certainly isn’t fast either.

5. The manual gearbox is too sluggish and the clutch is too heavy to really be enjoyable.

What We Tell Our Friends

The Dodge Challenger is the most muscle car of the muscle cars. It feels like you’re driving a classic car, but with all the modern tech and goodies. It’s also comfy and the UConnect system is a joy to use every day. It’s not easy to drive in the city and the SRT Hellcat models need to be respected, but driving a Challenger is a unique experience and when it comes to delivering performance without breaking the bank, the 2021 Dodge Challenger is among the best in the industry.

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Charles Jolicoeur
Charles Jolicoeur
Charles Jolicoeur was studying to be a CPA when he decided to drop everything and launch a car website in 2012. Don't ask. The journey has been an interesting one, but today he has co-founded and manages 8 websites including EcoloAuto.com and MotorIllustrated.com as General Manager of NetMedia360. He also sits on the board of the Automotive Journalists Association of Canada. Send me an email

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