Wednesday, June 29, 2022
News The 2022 Toyota Tundra Will Continue its Conquest Run

The 2022 Toyota Tundra Will Continue its Conquest Run

The all-new Toyota Tundra expands on a proven recipe, adds efficiency and capability


  • The new Tundra is completely new from the ground up.

  • The iForce engines are now twin-turbocharged 3.5-litre V6 with or without hybrid power.

  • Toyota expects the new Tundra to double its market share in Canada.


Though Toyota tried to keep the all-new 2022 Tundra under wraps as best as they could, ultimately, they failed. At the very least, however, they managed to keep some very important details hidden, or nearly. Despite the botched secrecy surrounding the new truck, there remained plenty to learn about at the first contact event.

2022 Toyota Tundra | Photo: Toyota


Born from invincible

Toyota knows that only the most exceptional new truck can hope to take customers away from another brand. Since the truck’s arrival for 2000, Toyota Canada has sold 150,000 units. Never meant to actually disrupt the three American offerings per se, the Tundra has nonetheless always been a conquest truck. The reality is that it always will be and that’s why Toyota Canada believes the new truck will double its market share to 5% from 2.5%. Here’s a prediction: most of these extra sales will come from the Nissan Titan.

Toyota is on a high as demand remains high for the current Tundra, making this an excellent time to launch the new third-generation full-size Tundra. Perhaps the most important piece of information in relation to this vehicle is that it is all-new. The current Tundra is/was one of the oldest vehicles still being sold as new as it debuted way back in 2006 for the 2007 model year.

2021 Toyota Tundra TRD Pro Lunar Rock | Photo: Toyota


Still rugged, but slicker

As such, the 2022 Tundra rides on an all-new high-strength fully boxed steel ladder frame on which sits an aluminium-reinforced composite bed. Two cab configurations and three bed sizes will be offered. The Double Cab will be matched to either a 6.5-foot or an 8.1-foot bed. The popular Crew Cab will continue with its 5.5-foot bed however, for the first time, the 6.5-foot bed will be available. For Limited trims and up, cabs will be mounted on hydraulic mounts for comfort and refinement. As well, crew cab models have a very Toyota-like power lowering rear window.

The new 2022 Toyota Tundra’s exterior design is immediately recognizable as being a Tundra. And this is key for current owners, as loyal buyers, want it known that they are driving a Tundra. The entire outer shell is new and follows the “technical muscle” mantra established by Toyota for the truck. The front fascia is powerfully busy with LED headlights, fog lights, and an enormous grille. Depending on the trim such as the TRD Pro, extra lights are fitted to the front. More precisely, all lights on the ’22 Tundra are now LEDs and fog lights are standard.

2022 Toyota Tundra | Photo: Toyota

Toyota worked hard on improving aerodynamics and refinement. Some examples include an under-body adjustable spoiler to single-piece door handles to lower exterior wind noise. Aluminium body panels are more prevalent for 2022 as the hood and rear fenders are now made of the lightweight material. These details more or less fall of deaf ears as the truck’s overall styling is what truly stands out. There’s little more to report on design other than “TRD Pro” stickers are replaced by the words being stamped into the rear gate.


Properly updated

On board, the air of familiarity continues. The dashboard is all-new but retains the typically legible controls that are simple to operate. Contrary to the previous Tundra, the new 2022 truck has been fast-forwarded into the 21st Century with new larger screens and far more technology. As standard, the Tundra is fitted with Toyota’s all-new Audio Multimedia system with five times more computing power, a 4.2 instrument panel display, and an 8-inch touchscreen that includes wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Further up the trim ladder, models such as the TRD Pro are upgraded with a 12.3 digital IP and a substantial 14-inch display. Toyota’s latest TSS 2.5 suite of active safety is standard on all trims, from the base SR to the 1794 and TRD Pro.

2022 Toyota Tundra | Photo: Toyota

Based on the trucks on display, the seats seem comfortable. The rear bench can easily slide three full-grown adults across. There’s plenty of storage in both rows with one exception: Tundras equipped with the iForce Max engine lose the rear under-bench storage bin as this is where the batteries are located.


Twin-turbo iForce Hybrid

That’s right. The 2022 Toyota Tundra will be available as a hybrid and it will be quite a duesy. The new iForce engine is a twin-turbocharged twin-intercooled 3.5-litre V6 that, without electrification, produces 389 horsepower and a GM-beating 479 lb.-ft. of torque. The available iForce Max features a motor-generator with a clutch located in standard new 10-speed automatic transmission’s bell-housing. Thanks to the electric motor, output rises to a staggering 437 horsepower and 583 lb.-ft. of torque.

2022 Toyota Tundra | Photo: Toyota

Toyota engineers designed the V6 to handle the boost and the loads. The cylinder heads are state-of-the-art and many tricks have been applied to keep operating temperatures nice and cool. As for the iForce Max, the hybrid system delivers both extra power when required, such as when towing up to 12,000 lbs, or will provide all-electric motivation under light throttle. Fuel-efficiency numbers are not yet known however the Max should impress.

On the road, Toyota promises the new 2022 Tundra will be good. The biggest update is the new multi-link rear suspension which replaces the old leaf-spring setup. In the process, the rear track has been widened for improved stability and increase towing (+17.6%) and hauling capacities (1,940 lbs +11%). Twin-tube shocks will be standard at all four corners unless a TRD off-road trim or package is selected which swaps in monotube Bilstein dampers.

2022 Toyota Tundra Suspension Teaser | Photo: Toyota

Other possibilities added to the Tundra thanks to the new rear suspension are an air suspension and an adaptive variable suspension. The former features height modes for off-roading and loading while the latter will further improve driving dynamics in all conditions.


TRD Pro

The flagship Tundra is without a doubt the TRD Pro version. It will get 2.5-inch FOX internal bypass shocks which lift the front of the truck by 1.1 inches. Other included features are a TRD Pro front stabilizer bar, red-painted suspension parts, various skid plates, and off-road Falken tires mounted on superb, forged BBS wheels. Other visual cues such as unique colours, dual exhaust tips, and more will continue to make it stand out from the Tundra line.

2022 Toyota Tundra | Photo: Toyota

The all-new 2022 Toyota Tundra arrives later this year. It will be assembled at Toyota Motor Manufacturing Texas (TMMTX) in San Antonio. Pricing will be announced closer to the on-sale date.

2022 Toyota Tundra | Photo: Toyota

2022 Toyota Tundra | Photo: Toyota

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Matt St-Pierre
Trained as an Automotive Technician, Matt has two decades of automotive journalism under his belt. He’s done TV, radio, print and this thing called the internet. He’s an avid collector of many 4-wheeled things, all of them under 1,500 kg, holds a recently expired racing license and is a father of two. Life is beautiful. Send Matt an emai

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